Mainframe Beats Cloud with a Roll of DICE

It is taking me awhile to scan all the big IT vendors to determine the types of R&D projects that seem to be in vogue these days, but along the path I’ve wondered what the “D” side of R&D is developing in these days.  If you want a full treatise on developer technology preferences and trends you really should look to Evans Data Corporation (“EDC”) http://www.evansdata.com/ who has been the niche research provider extraordinaire for everything having to do with development for as long as I can remember.  Even when I was a development tools analyst for IDC in the mid-1990s I looked with envy at EDC’s in-depth research.

But I didn’t have the time or money to work with EDC, so I cheated instead:  The other constant at least here in the USA in terms of metrics for the developer community is DICE – http://www.dice.com which has been the most prolific job site for IT types since, well, also as long as I can remember.  In a fit of curiosity I developed a long list of IT related keywords around technologies, applications and roles mainly, and put them up into the DICE jobs search in mid-December, 2009. (more…)

Cloud and Virtualization – Cro-Magnon Computing

January 7, 2010

Yes, I am going to express my view on Cloud and Virtualization.  Everyone else has, why not me?  Common wisdom is that the big enterprise computing innovations for the twenty-tens will ride on the backs of Cloud and Virtualization.  Fortunately, I have been exposed to the Cloud and to Virtualization longer than most, all the way back in the Cro-Magnon Computing era of IT, during which I was born as programmer.

In fact, I figure I was one of the first to actually use the Cloud.  Was I an early beta user of Salesforce.com?  Nope, that happened 10 years ago, late-to-the-game of the Cloud era.  I am talking Cloud circa 1973.  We used National CSS, at least I think that was the name, a timesharing facility out of Stamford, CT or near there.  On our remote terminals we would load a program, load data, and run the workload (we called it a job).  It would spit out a report that we could view online or we could print.  The NCSS “data center” was 200 miles away roughly from our downtown Boston office.  Is this a whole lot different than what you can do with Amazon EC2? (more…)

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